Last edited by Faura
Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

4 edition of Extermination of the Ocneria dispar, or gypsy moth. found in the catalog.

Extermination of the Ocneria dispar, or gypsy moth.

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Agriculture

Extermination of the Ocneria dispar, or gypsy moth.

by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Agriculture

  • 146 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by [s.n.] in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Insects,
  • Pests -- Control

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesExtermination of gypsy moth
    SeriesH.rp.709
    The Physical Object
    FormatElectronic resource
    Pagination2 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16027565M

    The European gypsy moth was discovered in the United States in in Massachusetts. It spread throughout the northeast and has become one of the country’s most destructive hardwood forest pests. It is known to defoliate acres of forest and urban trees. The defoliation alters forest composition and destroys the habitats of many birds and. Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus, ), Lymantriidae (Tofsspinnare).Wingspan: mm. Flies in January,June,July,August.

      Gypsy Moth caterpillars, Lymantria dispar. by Steve Ogden on 16 June with No Comments. Many sightings of Gypsy Moth caterpillars have been received in the last few weeks. Gypsy moth information page. In the UK most sightings have been from gardens in London and the south east. Bibliography Bibliography: p. Summary A comprehensive study of the life stages, biology, ecology, behavior, dynamics, economic importance, and success and failure of large- and small- scale control programs of the most destructive forest pest .

    (B.t.k.), the gypsy moth nucleopolyhedrosis virus (LdNPV), diflubenzuron, tebufenozide, DDVP, and disparlure. The gypsy moth itself poses the clearest risks in both the human health and ecological risk assessments. If the gypsy moth is not controlled, population outbreaks will occur and humans will be exposed to large numbers of gypsy moth larvae. The lymantriid forest defoliators, Lymantria monacha L. (nun moth) and Lymantria dispar L. (gypsy moth) are particularly severe pests in other countries in the world, but the ability of these.


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Extermination of the Ocneria dispar, or gypsy moth by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Agriculture Download PDF EPUB FB2

Gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.) and its natural enemies in the Far East (especially Japan). Annotated bibliography and guide to the literature through and host plant list for Japan. Delaware Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin, No.

Gypsy moth, (Lymantria dispar), lepidopteran that is a serious pest of both deciduous and evergreen trees. The European strain was accidentally introduced into eastern North America aboutand by it had become a serious pest of deciduous forests and fruit trees.

By the end of the 20th century the moth had spread to the western Great Lakes region. The Gypsy Moth caterpillar, Lymantria dispar. The Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar, is also known as the North American Gypsy Moth and the European Gypsy Moth.

The species is best known for the damage the caterpillars do to deciduous forests in many different parts of the world. In the US it is a particular pest of trees in eastern states. Gypsy Moth Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus, ) Family: Erebidae. Subfamily: Lymantriinae. Massachusetts in or by Leopold Trouvelot, who hoped to raise this moth for silk production.

Now, established from Nova Scotia to North Carolina and Florida, west to Michigan, Illinois, and Missouri. Range is expanding. The World Conservation Union ranks the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, on its list of " of the World's Most Invasive Alien Species." If you live in the northeastern U.S., you will heartily agree with that characterization of this tussock moth.

Accidentally introduced to the U.S. in the late s, the gypsy moth now consumes a million acres of. Lymantria dispar dispar, commonly known as the gypsy moth, European or gypsy moth.

book moth, or North American gypsy moth, is a moth in the family Erebidae that is of Eurasian origin. It has a range that extends over Europe, Africa, and North America.

Carl Linnaeus first described the species Lymantria dispar in The subject of classification has changed throughout the years, Family: Erebidae. The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, is an important economic pest that causes large-scale damage to forests e of its important role in initiating and controlling insect behavior, olfaction—and olfaction-based pest management—has drawn increasing attention from by: Gypsy Moth Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus, ) Wingspan mm.

In the early part of the 19th century, this was a common species in the East Anglian and southern fens, but by about had become extinct as a breeding species. Gypsy moth is an insect native to Europe and Asia that has been severely weakening trees across North America.

Gypsy moth was introduced to North America in the late ’s near Boston and has spread over the past century. Despite the successful use of insect predators, as well as fungal and viral controls, gypsy moth populations do. duction. Since then, gypsy moth has spread throughout the Northeast and well beyond.

It can be a serious pest of trees and a nuisance due to the irritating hairs on its body and the copious amount of excrement (frass) that it produces in high population years. The gypsy moth overwinters as an egg in a cluster of or more eggs (Figures 1 and 2).File Size: KB. Full text of "The gypsy moth.

Porthetria dispar (Linn.). A report of the work of destroying the insect in the commonwealth of Massachusetts, together with an account of its history and habits both in Massachusetts and Europe" See other formats.

The Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar Habitat: The gypsy moth was introduced to the US in Massachusetts Within the US, gypsy moths are found in deciduous forests in the northeast. The range of the gypsy moth extends as far south as Virginia and as far west as Michigan.

Outbreaks have also been. Abstract. The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus), is one of the most serious pests of hardwood forests in temperate regions. A cartographical analysis of gypsy moth 35 shows it to occur within the latitudes 20°–60°N, where annual rainfall is 25– cm and temperature isotherms are 15–27 ° C for July and —18–12°C for January.

The genus probably originated in Cited by: Lymantria dispar multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus or LdMNPV is a viral infection in gypsy moths (Lymantria dispar) that causes infected larvae to die and disintegrate.

Infected larvae climb to the top of a tree and die. The larvae then melt or disintegrate, falling onto the foliage below, where they infect more : Baculoviridae. Ingypsy moth larvae that were being evaluated for silk production, were blown from a window sill in Medford, Massachusetts.

The first outbreak of European gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) occurred in Bythe gypsy moth. Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar) Trapping Survey-MDA traps-Western Rotation: Central MN trapping routes, 4 lead worker areas-Sought CAI volunteers to assist with trapping in counties outside of MDA’s trapping area Counties participated-helped set additional traps-APHIS coordinated trapping on federal, tribal lands and delimitFile Size: 6MB.

The gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, is an important economic pest that causes large -scale damage to forests worldwide. Because of its important role in initiating and controlling insect behavior, ol-faction—and olfaction-based pest management—has drawn increasing attention from entomolo-gists.

he insect pest Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar) feeds on hundreds of varieties of trees and shrubs. The moth prefers the oak as a host tree - such as New Jersey’s state tree, Northern red oak.

the pRobleM The Gypsy Moth, originally from Europe, was introduced to Massachusetts in by a French botanist trying to develop the silkworm Size: KB. The lymantriid forest defoliators, Lymantria monacha L. (nun moth) and Lymantria dispar L. (gypsy moth) are particularly severe pests in other countries in the world, but the ability of these moths to utilise and complete development on Pinus radiata D.

Don had never been established. In laboratory trials, colonies of central European L. monachaCited by: 9. Management: Gypsy moth outbreaks occur periodically. Egg mass counts can be used to predict spring infestation levels, with 10 or more masses per tree indicating that severe defoliation may follow.

As egg masses remain somewhat intact for several years, be sure that the count includes only viable eggs. Gypsy Moth Facts, Identification & Control Scientific Name.

Lymantria dispar. Appearance. The gypsy moth has four developmental stages – egg, caterpillar (larva), cocoon (pupa) and adult. Male and female gypsy moths look very different. The adult female moth is white and has wavy, dark bands that run from the front to the rear of the front.Gypsy Moth, Lymantria dispar (L.) CONCERNS: Gypsy moth (GM) is a serious defoliator of hardwood trees and shrubs.

GM was accidentally introduced into New England in the late s and continues to spread across North America. In addition to being an overall nuisance, larvae may defoliate and kill trees and can cause allergic reactions in some.

Homeowners can find answers to any further questions on gypsy moths through the UConn Home and Garden Center. Update, J This week, dead gypsy moth caterpillars have begun appearing at the base of trees, killed by the naturally-occurring fungus Entomophaga maimaiga.

The rainy weather in May and June helped the fungus to develop.